No Plot? No Problem! Revised, Part Six

If you’d like to start at the beginning, here are the links. Preparation, Week One, Week Two, Week Three, Week Four.

This is for when you’ve hit 50,000/your word count goal, or the end of the month happens. Whichever you get to first.

Baty has some closing words about how awesome you are for making it through, regardless of if you made the words or not. Because let’s be honest, a 50,000 word draft in a month is just creative madness when you’re starting out. And, when you adjust the goal to meet where you’re up to so it’s still a challenge then getting through is still amazing.

What I really liked was the part where Baty converted word count into book pages. That was a fantastic little bit of morale boost for the exhausted writer I was when I stumbled across the end word count goal I’d set.

Baty also reminds you to celebrate with the people who helped you make it over the line, or even as close to it as you got. And I intend to do that. After a nap. And some healthy food…

The other thing he talks about is the after-effects of finishing NaNoWriMo. Especially since there is an anecdotal evidence that there is a state of ‘post-novel depression’, and I have felt it too, and wrote this ramble about it. Having a bit of a guide to come back to the real world and finding ways to include writing in your normal life is also really helpful.

It’s also got some ‘now what do I do with this?’ advice, and since if you’re anything like me there is a giant pile of typo riddled manuscript, it’s reassuring that there is a plan. And that it’s okay to have stories that didn’t work.

What I really like about this version is the advice on how to revise your work It walks you through a process you can use if you haven’t done it before, and gives you a timeframe so it keeps the two main cornerstones of NaNoWriMo with you. You have a plan, and a deadline. They may look different, and you’ll have to learn how to get along with your Inner Editor, but it’s worth it.

And there is a final bit of advice that I think is so important I have to repeat it. It’s okay to just write for fun. People do all sorts of things for fun, and writing can by a recreational activity that you challenge yourself with. Writing can be enough. It doesn’t have to be publishable. It can just be for you.

Just writing because you want to is enough.

 

Even if you never intend to try and smash your way through a novel like a drunken goat through undergrowth, this book gives examples of some really handy mental tricks to get your writing, editing, and putting it all in perspective so it can stay fun. It also prepares you for the ups and downs of creative endeavour without glossing over the parts that suck.

This is definitely a book I will go back to, likely when I’m in the middle of the overgrown estate that is Week Two and Three, because it will remind me that Week Four is coming.
And that it’s really nice to write ‘The End’.

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Bridget and I having a bit of a relax in her paddock. Getting up is overrated.

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